Rounders – the perspective of a 7-year-old with Asperger Syndrome

When I first started this blog, I asked:

Do I take you for a ride inside my mind, with all the odd twists and turns it takes? How uncomfortable would that be? Would it alienate readers who are not on the autistic spectrum? Or do I try to translate myself into language that is easy for people who are not on the spectrum to identify with?

I’ve tended to do a bit of both. I think that now, as an adult, with so much awareness, I’ve learnt to automatically translate myself into NT language.

But today I’ve written something pretty much in Asperger language – it’s a childhood memory, of which I was reminded today, and it occurred to me that it might be useful to write here, to show the Asperger perspective in a situation where people simply don’t ‘get it’ (and where I quite genuinely didn’t ‘get it’ either). Hope it’s not too alienating…

I am seven years old and at school. Mostly school means sitting at a desk and copying things from the whiteboard, which I can’t see very well, so sometimes I write things down wrong. I am slow at writing, so the words get rubbed off before I’ve written them all down, so then I get confused and lost, and I draw pictures instead. Our teacher is a man with a bald head, and when people say ‘That’s not fair’, he says ‘Life’s not fair’. He once hit a boy on the head with a Bible, which means he is a bad man, but he is never bad to me. I don’t think he knows who I am. He never notices that I’m confused and not writing what’s on the board. He only likes to talk to the boys – the clever boys who are good at maths, and have finished all the maths questions from the board, so he thinks of harder maths things to teach them, and they boast about who finishes first.

There is another teacher, who is a woman, an angry ugly woman with a hard face who looks like a bulldog. She likes to make fun of me. She makes us go outside, and it is often cold and always confusing, because I never know what we will have to do, even when she tells us. Often she chooses two people to choose everyone else, in turn. No one wants to choose me but eventually they have to because they run out of people. I don’t want to be chosen. I don’t like this game. It makes no sense. Everyone wants to be on the batter team, but I like to be on the fielder team, because then you get to just stand there and do nothing. Well, you are supposed to do something with the ball sometimes, but I don’t know what.

Being a batter makes me scared because someone throws a ball at me and I have to hit it with a heavy long piece of wood called a bat, but although I move the wood towards the ball, the ball just goes past it. This is called a miss, and people get annoyed with me for missing and they think I’m stupid. I’m supposed to hit the ball, but I can’t. I try, but it doesn’t happen. I can’t see where the ball is going, because it goes too fast, and I don’t have time to make the bat go to the exact place where the ball is going at just the right time. Other people can do it, but I don’t know how.

When I’ve missed the ball three times, I have to run. This is confusing. There are people standing by bits of wood sticking out of the ground, and I have to run to them and hit the wood with my bat. There are rules about running to different bits of wood and then stopping. If you keep running when you’re supposed to have stopped, that’s bad. If you miss the ball, you just run to the first one, which is easy, but the next person after me might hit the ball with the bat and might run to lots of wooden posts, and then I have to run too, but I don’t know when to stop. If I do it wrong, people shout at me. If the person behind me runs fast, I have to run fast, and I am not a fast runner, and I get scared because it’s like I’m being chased and people shout at me to run faster.

So I like being a fielder. Well, I don’t like it, but it’s better than being a batter. I don’t stand by a piece of wood in the ground. I stand far away in the field (that’s why it’s called a fielder). They make me stand far away, because then I don’t have to do anything, and then I can’t get it wrong and make them lose points. They all want to win, and they get upset if they don’t win. If I do things wrong, they won’t win. It doesn’t make any difference, though, who wins, because then we all go back and get changed and have to go back into the classroom and sit at our desks again and write things from the board. It is the same if you won or if you lost.

Sometimes, if you are a fielder, even if you are far away, you might have to do something with a ball. The angry bulldog teacher tells us that just because we are fielders, that doesn’t mean we always do nothing. The ball might come to us. This is confusing and I always hope that I will not have to do anything.

One day, I am a fielder, and the ball lands near me. I don’t care about the ball, and I don’t know what to do with it, but everyone else cares and everyone else knows what to do with it, so I let them get it. But they run around looking and they can’t find it. I don’t know why they can’t find it – I know exactly where it is, hidden there in the grass but you can see it in between the blades of grass. Why aren’t they finding it? They run around and look and shout. Sometimes they think they find it but they don’t. They say it’s lost. Then someone says to me, ‘Did you see it?’

‘Yes.’ I point to it. ‘It’s there.’ I am pleased to share my knowledge and do something useful in the game. They will be happy now, to know where it is, and that it isn’t lost.

People look at me and shout at me. They shout at me, angry, because I was standing there and I knew where it was and I didn’t tell them and I didn’t pick it up. They tell me this was wrong and bad. They ask why I was standing there. Because I am a fielder and fielders stand there. They ask why I didn’t tell them the ball was there. But I did tell them. They ask why didn’t I tell them before when I could see they were looking for it. Because they didn’t ask. I thought they would find it. They tell me I should have thrown the ball. That I should have picked it up and thrown it as hard as I could. I didn’t know that. Next time pick it up and throw it hard, they say. Well, some of them say that. Others mutter ‘Idiot!’

A few weeks later, I am a fielder again. The ball lands near me. This time I know what to do. I pick it up and throw it very hard. I don’t care about the ball, but I want to do the right thing, and I don’t want to be shouted at. I am pleased that I know what to do now.

People are shouting at me again. I don’t know why. I threw the ball. What were you doing, they ask. I was throwing the ball. I’m supposed to throw the ball. The ugly teacher says to me in her hard voice, making fun of me: ‘Where did you think were you throwing the ball to?’

‘I don’t know,’ I say. I was throwing it. How could I know where it was going to go?

Now people are telling me where I should have thrown it. It makes no sense to me. It’s about the pieces of wood in the ground. This piece of wood? I ask. Or that one? No, it will be different each time. It is about the person running.

This is too complicated. I don’t understand.

Next time the ball lands in the grass near me, I ignore it. I won’t help them this time. It’s a silly game.

 

It’s odd – obviously now as an adult it makes more sense to me, but I can clearly remember the confusion I felt. And even though I now understand intellectually, I still can’t understand emotionally the enthusiasm people feel about hitting a ball and running around, or why people get so emotional about winning or losing when there are no rewards.

Anyway, I also wanted to say I’m aware I haven’t updated this blog in a long time. I am very busy with college, and find multitasking hard, and so at the moment updates are infrequent. I hope to make them more frequent when I am less busy.

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